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A Comprehensive Patient Guide to Artificial Knee Replacement Surgery

Source: Stone Clinic – links preserved

BELOW: Surgery Video’s I have added.


Introduction to Artificial Joint Replacements

  • Joint replacement means replacing the worn-out, painful joint surfaces of the knee with metal and plastic components
  • Utilized if biologic knee replacement fails
  • If only one part of the knee is worn, a partial (uni) knee replacement can be performed
  • Can last up to 20 years

Total Knee Replacement (TKR) Surgical Technique

  • The goal of knee replacement surgery is the restoration of normal knee joint function
  • Incisions have become smaller with new minimally-invasive techniques
  • The upper (femur) and lower (tibia) bone surfaces are prepared and the prosthetic implants are placed
  • A plastic spacer is inserted and can be replaced to prolong the lifespan of the artificial joint

Partial Knee Replacement (UNI) Surgical Technique

  • When you wear out only one side of your knee joint, a partial knee device or unicondylar knee replacement is used
  • Our goal is to minimize the loss of normal tissue and replace only the damaged area
  • The existing ligaments and muscles are maintained for stability and movement of the knee
  • The knee compartment is resurfaced, implants are placed, and the knee joint’s range of motion is checked by bending and straightening your leg

Options for Blood Transfusion

  • Blood transfusions are sometimes used to restore blood volume after joint replacement
  • Red blood cells carry oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body
  • A blood transfusion is usually given to increase the number of blood cells that are available to carry oxygen
  • There are several options available for your blood transfusion
  • Patients can choose to receive their own previously-donated blood, or blood from another donor

Understanding Postoperative Pain Medications

  • Unfortunately, pain following major surgery is inevitable
  • There are several very effective methods available to control the pain following surgery
  • Options include: intravenous injections, patient controlled analgesia (PCA), intramuscular injections, pills by mouth, and an  epidural catheter, amongst others

What Activities May I Participate In After I Recover from Knee Replacement Surgery?

  • After undergoing knee replacement surgery, it is important to try to return to as active a lifestyle as possible
  • Most patients resume driving between 4-6 weeks
  • You are encouraged to climb stairs step over step immediately
  • Lower stress activities such as golfing, hiking, walking, biking, snow and waterskiing, stationary skiing, and swimming are encouraged
  • We take our patients’ pain very seriously and will do everything available to safely and effectively treat it

Taking Care of Your Lungs After Total Joint Replacement

  • Taking care of your lungs after surgery is an important part of the success of your surgery
  • It is important that your lungs are working at their best following surgery to ensure that you get plenty of oxygen to the tissues of the body that are trying to heal
  • Lungs that are not exercised properly can lead to poor blood oxygen levels and even develop pneumonia (an infection in the lungs) after surgery

Preoperative TKR Physical Therapy

  • A preoperative examination and preoperative treatment/intervention plan is created for each patient
  • A baseline of pain, functional abilities, strength, range of motion of each knee, and your breathing pattern is established
  • Any needs you have at home will be addressed

Postoperative Unicompartment Rehabilitation Protocol

  • Early emphasis is on achieving full extension equal to the opposite leg as soon as able
  • No passive or active flexion range of motion greater than 90 degrees for the first two weeks
  • No two-legged biking or flexion exercises for at least two weeks. Well-leg biking is fine
  • Regular manual treatment should be conducted to the patella and all incisions so they remain mobile
  • Early exercises should focus on recruitment of the vastus medialis obliquus (VMO)
  • No resisted leg extension machines (isotonic or isokinetic) at any point in the rehab process

Postoperative TKR Rehabilitation Protocol

  • Early emphasis is on achieving full extension equal to the opposite leg as soon as able
  • No passive or active flexion range of motion greater than 90 degrees until staples are removed
  • Regular manual treatment should be conducted to the patella and all incisions so they remain mobile
  • Early exercises should focus on recruitment of the vastus medialis obliquus (VMO).
  • No resisted leg extension machines (isotonic or isokinetic) at any point in the rehab process
  • CPM (continuous passive motion machine) may be issued based upon doctor’s recommendation per case

Potential Complications Following Knee Replacement Surgery

  • As with all major surgical procedures, complications can occur
  • Some of the most common complications following knee replacement are:
  • Thrombophlebitis
  • Infection
  • Stiffness
  • Loosening

How Your Primary Care Physician and Your Orthopaedic Surgeon Work Together

  • Before surgery, it is important that you arrange an appointment with your regular medical doctor
  • An orthopaedic surgeon is an expert on the conditions that affect the bones, joints and muscles of your body
  • Your medical doctor is an expert on medical conditions, and knows a great deal about your individual medical needs during the preparation, hospitalization and postoperative recovery

The Night Before Joint Replacement Surgery

  • What to eat
  • What medicines to take or avoid
  • Other considerations

What to Expect During Your Hospital Stay

RELEVANT LINKS:
Total Knee Replacement (TKR) Surgical Technique
Partial Knee Replacement (UNI) Surgical Technique
What Activities May I Participate In After I Recover?
Postoperative Unicompartment Rehabilitation Protocol
Postoperative TKR Rehabilitation Protocol

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